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Contents:
  1. Reward Yourself
  2. Patrick deWitt shortlisted for Leacock Memorial Medal | Quill and Quire
  3. Most of Me: Surviving My Medical Meltdown Robyn Michele Levy
  4. Iraq’s Medical Meltdown

We spent most of our time doing hospital consults and gradually acquired large consulting office practices that covered all aspects of nonprocedural internal medicine. I successfully treated the first toxic shock case in our area before the disease was described but was not so fortunate with a growing number of bizarre infections I began seeing in early more than a year before AIDS was defined. You were in practice in California as the health care system underwent drastic changes in that state.

What was your experience? Internal medicine radically changed as California became a pioneer in managed care. Procedural internal medicine spurred on by high reimbursements proliferated. During much of this time, our hospitals would add twice a many new cardiologists as new generalists. It seemed at first that the insurance companies and Medicare were singling out internal medicine for lower reimbursement. Additionally, our hospitals' implementation of the COBRA laws of was onerous to internal medicine.

We were mandated to take all unassigned medicine admissions often more than five in a night. Most of the family medicine physicians dropped off staff, and the specialists, such as the cardiologists, refused any case that did not require a cauterization.

Reward Yourself

Most of our cases were nonreinbursed. My office-based practice was similarly affected as managed care decided to pay me on a capitated basis. My large number of complex patients acquired during my consulting years in Sacramento were now a noose around my neck.


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We changed our name to Internal Medicine Associates and refused consultations. I went for 2 years without a vacation and moved to a smaller home as my income dropped by more than half. I was seeing more than 30 patients a day and had no opening for even a simple follow-up for months. During this period in the late s, we merged our man group into a large multispeciality "group without walls" of more than physicians to negotiate with insurance carriers and hospitals for contracts to help give us some control in this increasingly complex environment.

Unfortunately, reimbursements continued to tumble, and our overhead skyrocketed. Being in this larger group allowed us access to the salaries of other members. Although I was the highest-paid salaried internist, I made less than half of what my children's pediatrician earned and one-third as much as a starting anesthesiologist.

However, in two white knights appeared to save the day. Sutter Community Hospital began active negotiations to buy our foundering group. Leaving my old group would have been financially disastrous to my remaining colleagues, who had been my closest friends for more than 14 years. The Sutter offer suddenly solved this dilemma. At this same time I received an unsolicited offer to set up a solo practice next to Capital Medical Center, a small hospital in Olympia, Wash. The offer and timing seemed too good to be true.

My remaining original partners are still working for Sutter Health Systems but have quit their specialties of nephrology, rheumatology, and endocrinology and do primarily geriatric general internal medicine.

Patrick deWitt shortlisted for Leacock Memorial Medal | Quill and Quire

My only regrets were the loss of my collegial associates and friends and my old patients. How did you come to change your specialty from infectious diseases to diabetes? In , 1 week after the birth of our third child, our oldest daughter then age 2 came into our bedroom in the middle of the night complaining of being thirsty. My wife, a registered nurse and constant worrywart, asked if she could have diabetes, but I reassured her that I had never heard of a child that young developing diabetes.

Of course, I hadn't seen a pediatric case in more than 15 years.

Raising Emotionally Complex Children -- HOW TO SURVIVE A MELTDOWN -- Series Collab 3

She called me at the office in tears. I was in shock and felt I must be in the middle of a bad dream. My perfect little girl had a disease whose terrible complications seemed to dominate my practice. Our group ran the Sutter Hospital dialysis unit, where half the patients had diabetes. That afternoon, my wife, daughter, and I were in the office of the pediatric endocrinologist.

My wife and I were tearful, and I still remember my daughter asking if we were sick. We started her on insulin at that time.

DEPARTMENTS

We took her home and began our journey to learn and treat our daughter's disease. We first took home the four glucose monitors available at that time and practiced until we found our favorite. I devoted all of my educational time to diabetes and went to every available conference that I could. As a general internist, I thought I had a good understanding of the disease, but I soon found out I had a lot to learn.

After make the patient lose her balance but catch her before she falls, Levy is sorry that the party is over, especially when she gets a prescription instead of a grab bag. Both heartbreaking and hilarious, Most of Me offers a unique glimpse into a creative mind, an ailing body, and the restorative power of humour and fantasy. En tus brazos En tus brazos, 1 Any international shipping is paid in part to Pitney Bowes Inc.

Most of Me: Surviving My Medical Meltdown Robyn Michele Levy

Learn More - opens in a new window or tab International shipping and import charges paid to Pitney Bowes Inc. Learn More - opens in a new window or tab Any international shipping and import charges are paid in part to Pitney Bowes Inc. Learn More - opens in a new window or tab Any international shipping is paid in part to Pitney Bowes Inc. Learn More - opens in a new window or tab. Report item - opens in a new window or tab. Seller assumes all responsibility for this listing. Item specifics Condition: Brand New: A new, unread, unused book in perfect condition with no missing or damaged pages.

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About this product. With irreverent and at times mordant humor, Most of Me chronicles Robyn Michele Levy 's early, mysterious symptoms a dragging left foot, a crash into "downward dead dog" position on the yoga mat , the devastating Parkinson's diagnosis, her subsequent discovery of two lumps in her breast Little Lump and Big Blob , her mastectomy and her life since then dealing with her diverse disease portfolio.

She is accompanied on her journey by a fantastic cast of characters, including her Cry Lady who always makes appearances at inopportune times and perky Dolores the Prosthesis, as well as a convoy of health professionals, family members, friends, and neighbors. Both heartbreaking and hilarious, Most of Me offers a unique glimpse into a creative mind, an ailing body, and the restorative power of humor and fantasy. Business seller information. Contact details. Return policy. Refer to eBay Return policy for more details.